26th October, 2018

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet is a new exhibition from The Photographers’ Gallery that presents the work of 11 contemporary artists and groups seeking to map, visualise and question the cultural dynamics of 21st Century image culture.  Importantly, it investigates the systems through which today’s photographic images multiply online and asks what new forms of value, knowledge, meaning and labour arise from this endless (re)circulation of content.

Traditionally, photography has played a central role in documenting the world and helping us understand our place within it.  However, in a social media age, the problem of understanding an individual photograph is being overwhelmed by the industrial challenge of processing millions of images within a frantically accelerated timeframe.   Visual knowledge and authenticity are now inextricably linked to a ‘like’ economy, subject to the (largely invisible) actions of bots, crowd-sourced workers, Western tech companies and ‘intelligent’ machines.

View the Slideshow

Stop the Algorithm © Stephanie Kneissl and Max Lackner, 2017

The exhibition considers the changing status of photography, as well as the agency of the photographer and the role of the viewer within this new landscape.  The artists involved draw attention to the neglected corners of image production, making visible the vast infrastructure of digital platforms and human labour required to support the endless churn of selfies, cat pics and memes.  Certain works draw specifically on the experiences of content moderators, clickworkers and Google Street View photographers, and invite visitors to consider their own position in the image flow.

All I Know Is What’s On The Internet presents a radical exploration of photography when the boundaries between truth and fiction, machine and human are being increasingly called into question.

Participating Artists: Mari Bastashevski, Constant Dullaart, IOCOSE, Stephanie Kneissl & Max Lackner, Eva & Franco Mattes, Silvio Lorusso & Sebastian Schmieg, Winnie Soon, Emilio Vavarella, Stéphane Degoutin & Gwenola Wagon, Andrew Norman Wilson, Miao Ying

‘Asia as Method: Transnational Research in the Museum’ at Tate Modern on 6–7 December 2018.

‘Asia as Method: Transnational Research in the Museum’, Tate Modern 6–7th December 2018.

 

Tate invites scholars and curators to apply for funding to attend the symposium ‘Asia as Method: Transnational Research in the Museum’ at Tate Modern on 6–7 December 2018.

Deadline for applications:
26 October 2018, 5pm GMT

Nalini Malani, Gamepieces 2003/2009 © Nalini Malani
Nalini Malani
Gamepieces 2003/2009
© Nalini Malani

This international symposium, hosted by Tate Research Centre: Asia, represents the culmination of a six-year research project at Tate. Established in 2012 following a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Tate Research Centre: Asia has sought to deepen awareness of Tate’s growing international collection by developing access, public understanding and critical interpretation of Asian art. This symposium will provide the opportunity to hear from the centre’s researchers, who have worked on varied projects that have been committed to furthering the documentation, acquisition and display of modern and contemporary Asian art at Tate.

This funding will allow early career scholars and curators to hear from specialists in the field of Asian art and to meet with a broad network of researchers, scholars and curators.

Participants in the travel grant programme will receive funds sufficient to cover their travel costs and three nights’ accommodation in London within a set criteria.

To apply, please send a CV and cover letter (400 words) in PDF format indicating how attending this symposium will benefit your work and send it via email to trc.asia@tate.org.uk by 26 October 2018, 5pm GMT.

The selected candidates will be notified by 9 November 2018.